A Travellerspoint blog

Exmouth and Coral Bay

Ningaloo reef - here fishy, fishy!

We got to Exmouth not knowing what to expect. Our caravan park was below a lighthouse and when you drive up the hill you can see the ocean for miles. Another thing you can see are the whales returning to Antarctica with their babies. It was guaranteed sightings - FREE!
Ningaloo Lighthouse caravan park

Ningaloo Lighthouse caravan park

part of the 360 degree view of the ocean from the lighthouse

part of the 360 degree view of the ocean from the lighthouse

free whale watching - can you see them?

free whale watching - can you see them?


The lighthouse also became the place to view the sunsets and catch up with internet/phone to keep in touch. Below the lighthouse hill we were 'out of range'. Unusual for a place that has a government base with major communications networks - I think it was a spy place.
lighthouse at Exmouth aka internet/phone cafe!

lighthouse at Exmouth aka internet/phone cafe!

We'll give you 2 maps so we know what area of the WA coastline we are at.
Darwin to Perth simple map

Darwin to Perth simple map

Broome to Coral Bay map

Broome to Coral Bay map


Thanks to all those brochures we collect along the way, most of them have a simple map for our blogging!

Our caravan park and surrounds were powered by wind turbines but something happened to these ones. Maybe the winds were too strong for them and they fell over! We have seen a few along this coastline servicing small towns.
wind turbines powering Ningaloo reef area NOT

wind turbines powering Ningaloo reef area NOT


Another thing that popped up into the landscape was wildlife walking around the camp grounds looking for food.
looking for food!

looking for food!


We saw a lot of them from here on all the way to Perth. Some roadkill as well.

Geoff was looking forward to snorkelling off the beach. Again the waters were still turquoise and clear as can be. It was a bit intimidating to walk into the water and see fish all around your ankles looking for a feed. They are so tame. One could do very well with a fishing net! Of course being the conservationists that we are, it didn't even enter our heads then!

You could get into the water at one end and let the current drift you to the other side of the beach whilst snorkelling along the corals. It was hard work trying to not drift too far away anywhere out to sea. There is reef all around not too far from the beach and big waves breaking onto them.
Turquoise Bay at Ningaloo reef

Turquoise Bay at Ningaloo reef

swimming again at Turquoise Bay

swimming again at Turquoise Bay

Geoff thought that the corals and fish were not as good as the Barrier Reef but you don't have to pay a fortune to go on a boat to see something. We stayed for a day or 2 and then left for Coral Bay which is also part of Ningaloo reef. It was about 150 kms away.

This is where tourists come from all over the world to swim with the giant whale sharks from March to about May. There is an abundance of fish to see and also reef snorkelling. One could also snorkel straight off the beach - what a beautiful place. Had a prime spot at the caravan park called 'People's Park'. It overlooked the ocean and it was beautifully shaded. turquoise waters at Ningaloo reef

turquoise waters at Ningaloo reef


Coral Bay is only a small town with a few convenience shops there as well as the diving/snokelling/boat trips you can book. It is very popular with Western Australians who live in Perth and further south because they have cold winters. They book years in advance just to get a spot in the caravan park for at least a month and/or more. Of course it is also well known to the tourists.
Coral Bay

Coral Bay

Another popular thing to do was fish feeding daily. Mainly snapper and they were already swimming around early because they know what time it is!
the crowds that can't wait to feed the fish??

the crowds that can't wait to feed the fish??


Often they appeared on your dinner plate at night if you had fish and chips! They are so trusting that they swim right up to you and you can feel them slithering between your legs. Again a few people commented how good they would taste for dinner at night. Mostly they were snapper and very large. Yum!
here come the snapper! Yummy.

here come the snapper! Yummy.

friendly snapper coming in for food

friendly snapper coming in for food


In fact as soon as you go into the water to swim they come up to you!
the 'fish whisperer' returning from a big day of snorkelling at Ningaloo reef

the 'fish whisperer' returning from a big day of snorkelling at Ningaloo reef


We also did some walking along the beach and this was a nice photo I took.
Barra boy is not a bird whisperer!

Barra boy is not a bird whisperer!

Posted by blondnomad 05:48 Archived in Australia Tagged automotive

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Comments

Loved Coral Bay the best.
Keep enjoying yourselves

by Beryl Barrett

Hi again

I couldn't see the whales in the Ningaloo lighthouse photo. Let alone the babies. Are they called whalets or calves? Having heard recordings of their songs I think that perhaps they should be called wailers.

Anyway I think I know what the problem is. Whales are notoriously shy. They know that there is a lag between when you press the camera shutter button and the actual taking of the photo. They dive when they hear the first click. No-one has actually ever photographed one.

Except of course for Geoff who got that photo of the whale swimming on the beach at Turquoise Bay. Did they drag it back out to sea or slaughter it for oil on the spot? Did it blubber?

It's good to see that Geoff is so at good at communicating with the local aerial and marine wildlife. Perhaps he can fill the niche left by Steve Irwin. No, not the one with the urn in it.

Keep up the touristic hedonism. We love to hear the adventures and see the glorious photos.

John

by John Greenaway

Thats a great photo of a snapper at your feet..did you see any white pointers following them in? If you go as far south as Albany, don't do too much paddling around down there guys!! We lived at Mandurah in the mid70's for a couple of years, both working for Alcoa. Bet I wouldn't recognise it now.Keep enjoying your travels, you've certainly settled into the lifestyle nicely. xoxo Jan

by Jan Corbett

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